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September 7, 2021

Web-Crunch is for sale

If you have lurked on this blog or my YouTube channel recently you might have noticed a lapse in consistency. I want to address the reasoning and offer some perspective from a pet project that turned into something pretty remarkable. I'm also offering the entire publication/platform plus a few other IPs up for sale. More details to follow.

First things first

To anyone who has supported my efforts here over the years, I cannot thank you enough. I can't explain how empowered I felt when I began to get feedback and support from people I never met. I hit publish at least once a week for the better part of 7 years. I hope I was able to help you on your learning journey and also hope it can potentially continue for the next person(s) interested in carrying the Web-Crunch torch.

What web-crunch.com is in a nutshell

Web-crunch.com is a publication aimed at helping newer designers and developers learn about building and shipping products in the real world. Our sweet spot includes web app developers and the Ruby on Rails community in particular. Tailwind CSS, JavaScript, and entrepreneurship are other areas where a lot of focus has been put.

Most people visit the website or the YouTube channel (about 15,350 subscribers and over 1.4 million lifetime views) to watch tutorials and learn new things. We promote course content for hellorails.io on a lot of videos which is another part of the ecosystem that has performed best financially.

Some history

Web-crunch.com was born in the winter of 2013 (a few early posts were lost but here's the oldest as of today.). I created a basic customized WordPress theme and started writing articles about everything from design to freelancing. I had no intention of turning it into a publication/tutorial site other than the fact that I kept hearing that if you write on the web long enough, things start to take root and blossom into more opportunities. This theory is very much true.

What started out as text-only blog posts turned into video + text and sometimes vlogs and courses which I think really amplified the traction I was getting. YouTube can be a hell of marketing tool if you can stay consistent and provide real value.

Content these days is the main play for companies looking to promote their products and services. Offering a more personal approach toward consumers makes sense to better relate to problems and solutions. I didn't really look at it this way in the early days but did come to find out that it was as such the longer I hit publish.

Creating this blog opened a lot of doors for me. I got side freelance work, full-time job offers, and received direct support from people all over the world. I wrote three books (pro tumblr theming, LUXD: Learn User Experience Design and Hello Rails - Book Version) and offered a course called Hello Rails that is sitting at just over $35,000 in net revenue so far.

Web-crunch was my soapbox to learn new technology and stumble my way through side projects and learnings. Non-intentionally, the "public" part of blogging and recording video tutorials forces you to commit to the end goal in a stronger way. I was more likely to really learn something by recording myself doing it and writing/vlogging about it than trying to simply read books or watch other tutorials (not to mention every tutorial was always my second time building the project I was writing/recording about). I learned very quickly that I also enjoyed teaching which helped me commit and execute even more.

Quitters quit

As the old saying goes, "Only quitters, quit". I guess you could say I'm a quitter but deep down I've come to a point in my life where letting go feels good. I came, I saw, and I didn't quite conquer but I did see some great success and believe there's plenty of more to be had for someone else. Life is different now. My family requires more of my time and I am putting more "work" related things in the back seat for the first time in my life. Living my life is a big focus so I'm putting more emphasis on new experiences while I can.

Ultimately, I don't think humans are meant to be creative on a schedule. This blog was that for me but it got to be so routine and such a hurdle to produce, edit, and distribute that the bad outweighed the good. So, I'm throwing in the towel and offering it up for someone new to take the reigns and see it through.

Now to the nitty-gritty...

What's for sale exactly?

Because there's more than just the blog, I'm offering the associated domains for sale alongside it. This includes web-crunch.com, the web-crunch YouTube channel, hellorails.io, the pro tumblr theming book/site, and the LUXD: Learn user experience design book/site and all email lists (about 1000-1500 subscribers collectively).

Ownership would include all domains, code, data, content, communities, and financial accounts (Stripe/Braintree).

I'd prefer selling it as a lump sum transaction for all IPs but can be flexible if only one area is of focus.

What kind of revenue does it make?

Revenue on the blog was never a huge focus. It paid my hosting fees but that's more or less it. That could be incredibly more optimized for someone looking to expand.

  • Ads - ~ $100-$250/mo between web-crunch.com and YouTube
  • Course earnings - Has earned just over $35k. Sales are still coming in but it's a trickle effect.

Is there potential here?

I definitely think so. While this entire operation was run by a single person (me), I think if you're interested in doing something similar or expanding on what I have, you are likely a great candidate to take over and see success. I could only work on it part time but if given a full-time commitment there would be room to grow year after year for sure.

Expansion:

web-crunch.com

  • Position the blog and channel in more markets (JavaScript, Node, Laravel/PHP, WordPress)
  • More courses
  • Ad spaces use simple AdSense ads. We gross maybe $100-$250 a month in ad revenue between the blog and the YouTube channel.
  • I receive about 1-5 inquires for sponsored content per month but have never pulled the plug on such an endeavor. Over time those types of transactions could earn serious money.
  • The blog is set up to offer a "premium" post feature where a visitor would need to pay to view a specific post. I integrated both Stripe and Paypal but actually never published a premium post yet since it was more of a long-term idea. This could be great for a lengthy guide, micro-course, or something more.
  • Nurture the email list (about 500-700 subscribers) and market new products/projects

hellorails.io

  • Sales are still coming in though have slowed down since my initial launch a couple of years ago. The course has made just over $35k to date and features over 200 customers.
  • Offer a next-level version of the course in a reboot type of style. Perhaps more advanced features/lessons.
  • Nurture the email list (about 700 subscribers) and market new products/projects.

YouTube

  • We hear a lot of requests for Rails-specific content including adding javascript frameworks like React to the mix.
  • All Rails and Tailwind content perform the best. Sticking to those at first might be a good idea and then branching out.
  • My style of teaching was to build realistic projects from start to finish rather than just teaching specific concepts. Putting real principles and practices to use seems to jive with a certain type of audience.

Tech

Stack

  • I primarily reached for Ruby on Rails for all projects just because it's so fast for me. Some projects might use middleman as a lighter-weight alternative.

Hosting

  • Static sites are netlify/github free hosting.
  • Any rails/ruby projects all on hatchbox.io. I was an earlier customer so I have a cheaper plan than what's advertised.

Payments

  • Primarily Stripe but also have a Braintree account

Metrics

For serious offers I'm happy to share more detailed stats

Google search stats from the month of August 2021

  • ~ 6.05k clicks
  • ~ 263k impressions
  • Average CTR - 2.4%

Top performing countries:

  • United States
  • India
  • United Kingdom
  • Brazil

How much?

Open to offers! Email me at andy [at] web-crunch.com if you're interested in discussing. Serious offers only, please.

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